Windows: creating the perfect system

Windows: creating the perfect system

Although Windows 10 is far from perfect, it offers a lot of possibilities for customization. We tell you how to change inconvenient system settings even without knowledge of registry functions – just by downloading the necessary command files.

Windows 10 offers a lot of features, but still the system is far from perfect – and this is probably already understood by almost all users. Nevertheless, the Microsoft operating system has countless possibilities for personalization. With the right settings and tools, you can build your ideal Windows 10.



One of the most powerful tools in terms of functions and optimization options is the Registry editor or Registry. This database of all sorts of options and settings allows a professional Windows user to enable or disable system functions by changing specific settings. But the process can be even simpler: running registry files allows you to automatically change the appropriate settings without having to go through the registry yourself.

We have collected some useful commands as an exe file – just download and open it on your computer to apply the new Windows 10.

Remove Bing from Windows

The two giant shortcomings of Windows 10 are called Bing and Cortana. While the Cortana Virtual Voice Assistant can be easily turned off without any major interference to the system, the Windows default search sends a Bing request. But by editing the registry, you can disable the search engine once and for all, so that when you query the system, the search will only be performed locally on your computer.



Disable lock screen

Another thing that is time consuming and annoying to many users is the Lockscreen. Of course, the beautiful Lockscreen is not necessarily a bad thing, but it can be called a relic left over from trying to make Windows more comfortable for tablets. On a computer, it has no special features. Those who prefer to see the password field immediately can simply turn off the lock screen.

Edit old image viewer

With the registry you can not only disable new functions, but also “revive” the old and known ones. In particular, this is the popular viewer from Windows 7: although it is hidden, it has not yet completely disappeared from Windows 10. Through the Registry, you can unlock the Photo Viewer, so you don’t have to go to a new app for your photo archive.

Clear Explorer

Explorer has many things to do without. A lot of folders are pre-configured but not used. The folder “Volume objects” is especially useless for many users – but it can be easily hidden using the registry.

OneDrive can be less annoying because even the one who deletes the application will have to accept the OneDrive link in Explorer. But you can easily disable it with the appropriate registry file – and immediately get more space in Explorer.

Easy to optimize taskbar

One of the functions that has been around for a long time is the display of various open windows in the taskbar. For example, if you click on a browser, you will see all the open windows. And only when you select a particular window, it will open. But with the registry, you can change this: by default, the last window opened by the corresponding program will be displayed.

System Tray (notification area), more precisely, the clock, can also be changed through the registry. By default, they do not show seconds (you can see them by clicking on the clock). If you want to make things easier, you can customize the display of seconds right in the taskbar with a small registry edit.



WARNING! All links in the articles may lead to malicious sites or contain viruses. Follow them at your own risk. Those who purposely visit the article know what they are doing. Do not click on everything thoughtlessly.


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